Thursday, June 07, 2007

Say Cheese!

 
Homemade mozzarella, following a recipe from Andrew of Geek Farm Life

This was SO easy to make. The hardest part was tracking down the citric acid and a thermometer which read low enough. Following a suggestion from Andrew, I got both at a Homebrew shop in Glasgow

Start to finish? About 45min including preparation, although Number Guy tells me that milking the local buffalo took a darn sight longer.
Yield - 1lb cheese from 8 pints milk. Although this will be best fresh, I am going to freeze 3/4 of it.
And what's next on the cheesemaking front? Well, I think I might be able to make ricotta from the whey (or I may be totally wrong about that). If I can, I'll try that the next time I make my very own mozzarella.

And in the meantime I'm going to track down some enzymes and have a go at some other cheese.

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10 Comments:

Blogger Kathleen said...

Can you make your own mozzarella? Can you freeze cheese?
x K

9:26 pm  
Blogger Midsummer night's knitter said...

Yes to both. Go to the Geek Farm Life blog via the link - the cheese podcast was either last week or the week before.
Freezing cheese is fine, but it does alter the texture. Dome cheese obvioulsy keep for ages, but not this kind - specially as there are no preservatives in it ;0) just organic milk, vegetarian 'rennet' and citric acid.
India

9:29 pm  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

That is well cool, I Want to make mozarella, I made Haloumi a while ago, and mozarellas next on the list. Thanks for the comment by the way, I only jut read it now, I am a nichiren buddhist, which is a japanese form of buddhism.
jeni
fyberspates

9:43 pm  
Blogger DaviMack said...

Wow! How's it taste, with the buffalo milk rather than cow's milk? (And do the highland cattle provide a differently flavored milk, by the way?)

I'd definitely save the whey, to use in quickbreads. It adds a nice tang, raises the acidity, and adds some nutritional stuff, too, 'though it's escaping me right now.

Cool!

10:36 pm  
Blogger Midsummer night's knitter said...

Well, this is great Mozzarella - D, I'm not sure how much of your post was taking the mickey out of me, or if you transposed the buffalo and cow - I'm assuming maybe a bit of both...We used organic milk from our local supermarket. It has obviously been pasteurised. I stretched the cheese until it was very 'bouncy' so when we ate some it was squealy ;0)
Next time I am going to make half of it less firm, to see what that is like.
Intersetingly, I saw a site that said you can't make it from goat milk, which I find very odd since Andre makes his from goats'.
]

11:12 pm  
Blogger scarybez said...

Wow - I am so impressed! Does it taste the same as shop bought mozzarella? And roughly how long did it take you to make?

I'm also intriged by Jenni's haloumi making efforts - I adore haloumi.

I always assumed cheese making was a really long a laborious process. Maybe I'll have to give it a go...

10:43 am  
Anonymous Andrew said...

I always love doing the impossible. Goat milk works fine and I could strech the cheese forever if my hands were long enough. :)

2:59 pm  
Blogger DaviMack said...

I wasn't teasing, actually. I'd assumed that you'd somehow gotten ahold of buffalo milk, as you'd said "...milking the local buffalo took a darn sight longer." And I'm in California ... where people actually buy buffalo milk mozzarella on purpose.

I did. Once. It was enough. Gamey. Bleh.

I was wondering about the cows, though, since there're the highlands which are quite different ... and I'm not so much of an expert on all things animal. ;)

I'd think chevre w/ goats' milk, rather than mozzarella.

9:12 pm  
Blogger Wee Minty said...

Do you ever sleep?

12:41 am  
Anonymous Wildgarlic said...

That looks yummy.

I love mozzarella, it's one of my favourite cheeses but haven't ever tried making it. I love it made with buffalo milk but it's SOOOOO expensive.

When our goats are in milk again I might give it a try with the goats milk and see what happens.

9:58 am  

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